Tuesday, June 16, 2009

UN meeting 'Advancing global health in the face of crisis' - only UNICEF speaks to breastfeeding as essential

With thanks to my old friends at UNICEF, in this high level forum, only UNICEF Executive Director Ann M. Veneman mentioned breastfeeding in her panel discussion on "Protecting vulnerable populations."
Notes on her presentation included the following. I added the bolds.
9.2 million children die before the age of 5 years, and that 93 per cent live in Africa and Asia. Around 3 million die in the first 28 days of life. A woman in the Niger had a 1-in-7 lifetime risk of maternal mortality, compared to Ireland, where the risk was much lower 1 in 40,000. When searching for a solution, it was important that policy-makers understood the link between maternal and newborn health. For a start, adequate nutrition for the mother was key to good health in their babies. In turn, early childhood nutrition was important, because one third of deaths in children under 5 were thought to be caused by malnutrition. Poor nutrition also made a person more likely to die of diseases such as malaria, while lack of breast-feeding contributed to 1.4 million deaths. She noted that pneumonia and diarrhoea were among the biggest killers among children –- diseases that were linked to HIV/AIDS, various tropical diseases and the flu. During a time of financial crisis, it was more important than ever to ensure that women and children, along with other vulnerable populations, had access to preventive and basic health services.
read more at: She explained that 9.2 million children died before the age of 5 years, and that 93 per cent lived in Africa and Asia. Around 3 million died in the first 28 days of life. A woman in the Niger had a 1-in-7 lifetime risk of maternal mortality, compared to Ireland, where the risk was much lower 1 in 40,000. When searching for a solution, it was important that policy-makers understood the link between maternal and newborn health. For a start, adequate nutrition for the mother was key to good health in their babies. In turn, early childhood nutrition was important, because one third of deaths in children under 5 were thought to be caused by malnutrition. Poor nutrition also made a person more likely to die of diseases such as malaria, while lack of breast-feeding contributed to 1.4 million deaths.
She noted that pneumonia and diarrhoea were among the biggest killers among children –- diseases that were linked to HIV/AIDS, various tropical diseases and the flu. During a time of financial crisis, it was more important than ever to ensure that women and children, along with other vulnerable populations, had access to preventive and basic health services.

Read more at:

http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/rwb.nsf/db900SID/MYAI-7T33XZ?OpenDocument

1 comment:

echo 3d said...

The blog is really nice one and full of information we appreciate the kind of information you have provided in this post. The information are so useful for all of us and we would like to thank you from the bottom of our heart for this wonderful information.The things you have discussed about in this post which are supposed to be very helpful for us. Because of these wonderful information in this post the blog can be viewed again and again.